Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration: Hype or Hope?

Posted in Conferences, Companies, Science on December 10, 2008



Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as an important part of the portfolio of technologies for lowering emissions of greenhouse gases. This talk provides an overview of CCS, including the world-wide potential for emissions reductions with CCS, capture options and costs, what is known about the security of geological sequestration, potential environmental impacts and approaches for managing risks. While much of the science and technology for CCS can be borrowed from existing industries, there are outstanding issues that should be addressed to support implementation at the large scale that will be needed. This talk will discuss what we know, and what we don't knowand the steps needed to narrow the gap between hype and hope.

Speaker: Professor Sally M. Benson
Sally M. Benson was appointed GCEP Executive Director in March 2007. An internationally-recognized scientist with extensive management experience, Benson is responsible for guiding the development of GCEPs diverse research portfolio. A Professor (Research) in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering in the School of Earth Sciences, Benson has been a member of Stanfords faculty since 2007.

Prior to joining GCEP, Benson was a staff scientist in the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In 2004, she completed a four-year term as Deputy Director of Operations at the lab. Benson also served as Division Director for Earth Sciences and Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Sciences at LBNL.

A ground water hydrologist and reservoir engineer, Benson has conducted research to address a range of issues related to energy and the environment. Her research interests include geologic storage of CO2 in deep underground formations, technologies and energy systems for a low-carbon future, influence of climate change on critical habitats, biogeochemistry of selenium, and geotechnical instrumentation for subsurface characterization and monitoring.

Benson graduated from Barnard College at Columbia University in 1977 with a bachelors degree in geology. She completed her graduate education in 1988 at the University of California, Berkeley, after receiving masters and doctoral degrees, both in materials science and mineral engineering.

The author or co-author of over 160 scientific publications, Benson is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Society of Petroleum Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Chemical Society.

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October 23, 2008

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